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Master Tonic Recipe

Posted by Ariel on October 20, 2009 at 1:15 PM

I presented this recipe as part of my Pagan Pride Day workshop.  It takes a couple of weeks minimum to make.  If you don't want to use it to kick a flu bug in the butt, you can always use it in its other guise as an awesome hot condiment.

This is a simple tincture, useful for many things.  The properties of Master Tonic are Probiotic: antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal and antiparasitical.  The basic recipe comes from The University of Natural Healing: Dr. Richard Schulze adaptation of Dr. Christopher's original anti-plague tonic.

 

THE BASIC RECIPE

Ingredients: 

Raw Unfiltered Unbleached Non-distilled Apple Cider Vinegar (Braggs is excellent)


The following ingredients should be organic if possible, and only bought right before making your tonic.  Dried herbs may be used if no other alternatives exist.

1 part fresh chopped garlic cloves

1 part fresh chopped White Onion (or hottest onions) yellow is next strongest, and red is weakest

1 part fresh grated Ginger Root (no need to peel)

1 part fresh grated Horseradish Root (no need to peel)

1 part fresh chopped Cayenne Peppers (use seeds but not stems)

or the hottest peppers available, i.e. Habanera, African Bird, or Scotch Bonnets, etc.

 

Instructions:

Fill a glass jar ~3/4 of the way full w/equal parts by volume (i.e. a cupful each) of the above fresh chopped and grated herbs. Then fill jar almost to the top with RAW, Unfiltered, unbleached, non-distilled apple cider vinegar. Close and shake vigorously and then top off the vinegar if necessary.

Shake at least once a day for a minimum of two weeks then filter the mixture through a clean piece of cotton (old T-shirt, etc.), bottle and label. Make sure that when you make this tonic that you shake it every time you walk by it, a minimum of once per day.

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Amounts for a half-gallon jar

1 c. of each herb, plus 32 oz of Bragg's vinegar

1 cup translates, more or less, to these unchopped quantities:

3 good-sized bulbs garlic

1 large onion (4" diameter)

1 healthy-sized piece of ginger

5" x 2" diameter piece of horseradish root

15 habanero peppers

This should be MORE than enough for one person for a year, with some extra to share with friends.  A batch will generally stay good for about a year (maybe two), and then a new batch should be made.

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NOTES

Herbs don't need to be chopped finely - maybe 1/8" TO 1/4" chop.. Horseradish is a tough root, and the chunks can be a little larger.  A food processor is incredibly helpful.  If you cut the peppers by hand, be sure to use disposable gloves, and keep the pepper juice away from your eyes.

For a children's formula use milder peppers and less ingredients proportional to vinegar.

Make sure you use a GLASS (or stainless steel) jar.  This tonic is very acidic, and will leach out nasty additives from aluminum and plastic.

2 weeks is a MINIMUM tincture time.  You can tincture longer (up to 4 weeks)  One possibility is to start your tincture on the full moon and let it brew until the next full moon.

Master Tonic is completely non-toxic (unless you’re allergic to any of the ingredients).  It’s a fantastic condiment, especially if you enjoy Tabasco or other spicy sauces.

Master Tonic DOES NOT NEED TO BE REFRIGERATED.  I recommend keeping it in a cool dark area as much as possible.

 

DOSAGE

Master tonic may be diluted with water or drunk straight.  It may be mixed with honey and/or water.

When sick, take 2 or 3 droppersful in some water every hour until symptoms are gone. 

For ORDINARY infections, 1 dropperful taken 5-6 times a day will help most conditions. 

It may be used during pregnancies and is safe for children (use smaller doses).

Categories: Herbals

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1 Comment

Reply Ariel
10:59 AM on August 30, 2010 
I've learned that using habeneros makes the final product too hot for me, so I stick with jalapenos. My husband, on the other hand, LOVES his heat, and prefers the habaneros. We make separate batches, according to our individual tastes. We're very careful about labelling each batch :)

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